Author Archives: Kimberly Vlies

Do you want more out of your UWGB experience? Adhere to the “Seven C’s” says Meyer

UW-Green Bay’s Secretary of the Faculty and Staff Steve Meyer was the sixth and final speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series,” presented in celebration of the University’s 50th Anniversary.

Meyer, also a member of the UWGB science faculty, presented “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Seven C’s” on Wednesday, April 27 in the Christie Theatre of the University Union.

Many familiar with UW-Green Bay have heard of UWGB’s “3 T’s” — known affectionately as trees, tunnels and toilets (in every dorm room). (Recent students have added a fourth — teachers). Meyer suggests in his Last Lecture that if the UW-Green Bay family focuses less on the “T’s” and more on the “C’s” UWGB would be a better place to work, play and study.

“The C’s are not conifers, commodes and concourses,” he joked, but “cavort, challenge, conviction, compassion, considerate, character and commitment.” Meyer’s heartfelt presentation was a reflection on his personal faith as a Christian, and his potential influence as a friend, father, husband, teacher and peer.

“In the end,” he says, “Life is all about relationships… The only thing that matters in the world are the people in your life… and the most important thing you can do is touch the lives of others.”

In Prof. Meyer style, he left the Last Lectures audience to reflect on two classic movie scenes — one from “It’s a Wonderful Life” when angel Clarence tells George, “Remember, no man is a failure who has friends,” and from the pop classic “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” “Be excellent to each other.”

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”
  • April 27 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”

Video: Phil Clampitt’s Last Lecture

Prof. Phil Clampitt, the fifth speaker in the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series,” presented, “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

“I’ve been researching how to manage uncertainty for many years and I’ve been fascinated by innovation since I was a young boy,” said Clampitt, as to why he selected this particular topic. His lecture focused on the intersection of uncertainty management principles and innovation, and concluded with a discussion of personal life lessons for thoughtful human beings.

In a presentation that he said wouldn’t be appropriate for the classroom, Clampitt allowed the crowd of faculty, staff, students and quite a large representation of alumni (traveling as far as from Madsion) in the Christie Theatre, a glimpse at his personal side. He summarized his presentation with four recommendations:

  • Embrace doubt
  • Experiment and debate where to tweak
  • Move beyond fears
  • Express gratitude

Clampitt is the Blair Endowed Chair of Communications at UW-Green Bay and has been a member of the faculty since 1981. The popular faculty member has written and co-authored a number of books including his best-seller, “Communicating for Managerial Effectiveness, and Embracing Uncertainty: The Essence of Leadership.” He is a requested speaker across the United States —including a presentation at the U.S. Army War College — and internationally, at the University of Pisa, University of Aberdeen and the University of Ulster, among other locations.

The published author has works in journals such as the MIT Sloan Management Review, Academy of Management Executive, Management Communication Quarterly and Journal of Business Communication.

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:

Fifty and Forward: UWGB’s Time Capsule for 2065

In celebration of UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary, a cornerstone, which was ceremonially placed in conjunction with 1968 construction of the first campus buildings, was opened in summer of 2015. Contents were intended to document the beginnings of the University in 1965 and its community partnerships. Items ranged from early campus plans regarding layout and curriculum as well as a directory of local government offices; area newspapers; and an original souvenir plate commemorating Super Bowl I and the win of the Green Bay Packers in 1967.

Looking forward to UW-Green Bay’s 100th anniversary, the University is creating a new time capsule to be opened in 2065 telling the story of UWGB today. The campus community is invited to help choose the contents for this capsule which is planned to be about the size of a  small file cabinet (2′ x 2′ x 4′). Planners are seeking input and suggestions of specific objects to be included. To make suggestions, complete the Fifty and  Forward:  UWGB Time Capsule 2065 survey by Sunday, March 13, 2016. From the submissions, a committee of students, faculty and staff will choose the objects to be placed in the time capsule.

Take the survey

Slides: Prof. Lucy Arendt’s Last Lecture

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Download the presentation slides (pdf)

“Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness” were key values according to our Founders. So what would they think, then, of our 24/7 work schedules, the outsized value we place upon work and material consumption today, and the fear that drives many to acquiesce to organizational demands that run counter to their own values and needs? Have our individual rights and freedoms been sacrificed to the organizational value system? These questions were explored by Prof. Lucy Arendt in her “Last Lecture.” Unlike the past 50th Anniversary Last Lectures, hers will not be readily available on video. PBS is broadcasting the presentation as part of its University Place programming at a future date. We have made her slide deck available for those who would like a preview.  Also, see the Inside News article to read more and see a few photos.

Video: Gallagher-Lepak’s Last Lecture

E-learning isn’t simply learning with technology, says Susan Gallagher Lepak, a Professor of Nursing at UW-Green Bay.

It is a process of teaching and learning supported by e-technologies that provides a structure for learning directed at impacting knowledge construction by the learner. “Students generate knowledge and meaning through interacting with content,” she says… “access content, think about it, negotiate meaning, apply concepts, communicate about it, etc… It’s an active process!”

It’s obviously a topic Gallagher-Lepak is passionate about, and as a faculty member heavily involved in teaching online courses at UW-Green Bay, it is why she chose to share, “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station,” a topic of her choosing if she had only one final lecture left to give. She is the third of six UW-Green Bay faculty members taking part in the Last Lecture Series, a program which celebrates UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary.

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

Video: Entwistle’s Last Lecture

What else would you expect from a theater faculty member? Upon introduction, UW-Green Bay Theatre and Dance Prof. Jeff Entwistle promptly traded his tie and buttoned up shirt for more comfortable attire that he and his students have come to identify as “either paint clothes or eventual paint clothes.” A chuckle from the audience was the first of many during Entwistle’s fun and impassioned reflection on “Why We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future.” The topic was of Entwistle’s choosing when asked what he would say if he had only one last lecture to give. His was the second of six UW-Green Bay faculty members taking part in the Last Lecture Series, a program which celebrates UW-Green Bay’s 50th Anniversary.

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

Video: Jeffreys’ Last Lecture

Humanistic Studies Prof. Derek Jeffreys delivered the first of a series of “Last Lectures” by UW-Green Bay faculty members as part of the University’s 50th Anniversary celebration. Jeffreys, who was asked to present a lecture topic as if it was his last chose, “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison,” to a large audience of students, faculty, staff, alumni and community members in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, Sept. 23.

A video recording of his presentation, surrounding the insights he gained teaching and working with inmates at the Green Bay Correctional Institution, is now available. Jeffreys imparted the dangers of dehumanization, the distinction between the “inner” and “outer” of a person, and the possibility of real change for some individuals.

UW-Green Bay’s “Last Lecture Series” takes place during the 2015-16 academic year in celebration of the University’s 50th anniversary. Each month, a UW-Green Bay faculty member will present on a topic of his or her choice. The monthly lectures will take place Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the University Union’s Christie Theatre, on the campus at 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay. The lectures are free and open to the public.

The following is the list of Last Lecture participants and topics:

  • Sept. 23 — Derek Jeffreys, Professor, Humanistic Studies
    “The Mystery of the Person: Teaching Philosophy and Religion in a Maximum-Security Prison”
  • Oct. 28 — Jeff Entwistle, Professor, Theatre and Dance
    “We All Need Theatre in Our Lives and in Our Future”
  • Nov. 18 — Susan Gallagher-Lepak, Associate Professor, Nursing
    “E-Learning: The Train has Left the Station”
  • Feb. 17 — Lucy Arendt, Associate Dean, College of Professional Studies
    “Made to Serve: The Tragic Corruption of America’s Founding Values”
  • March 23 — Steve Meyer, Associate Professor, Natural and Applied Sciences
    “Forget the Three T’s: Focus on the Six C’s”
  • April 13 — Phil Clampitt, Professor, Information and Computing Science
    “The Magical Connection between Uncertainty, Innovation, and the Human Spirit.”

Scott Knapp’s UWGB 50th Anniversary Kickoff Address

On a cold, windy day in November nearly 50 years ago, Scott Knapp was there at the beginning of the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. As president of what would become the UW-Green Bay Student Government Association, he was given the honor of saying a few words at the first groundbreaking for the new campus. Knapp recalled that day in his keynote address to a 50th anniversary breakfast on the UWGB campus Sept. 2, 2015. Today the president of Central Maine Community College, he said he learned a lot about leadership from Founding Chancellor Edward Weidner. He recalled that the soon-to-open UWGB — short-staffed, operating out of makeshift offices and scrambling to prepare for the fall 1969 opening of the Shorewood campus — delegated plenty of work to students, and involved them in key decision-making.

top 50 teaching poll

Vote: Award-winning teachers

UW-Green Bay has presented a Founders Association Award for Excellence in Teaching annually since 1975. The distinguished list of honorees (nominated and selected over the years by their peers) is by no means complete, but is as good a starting point as any for an informal poll inviting your input on favorite faculty over the years.

“Vote” for a maximum of three.  And please share other names in the comment section below if there are others — personal favorites, talented researchers or individuals with relatively brief UWGB teaching careers who nonetheless made an impact — whom you believe deserve special mention.

Vote: Award-winning teachers

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UW-Green Bay Memorabilia

Corn maze. Fighting tomatoes. Sailing club. Blue shag covered elevator walls. Opening of the Kress Sports Center. Shorewood Club. Liberal Education Seminars. Eco U. Living in the Trads.

Can you tell we are deeply immersed in projects to celebrate the 50th anniversary of UWGB? Here is a glimpse of a few items we are gathering.

What would you like to see highlighted as part of UWGB’s history? Send us your memories and stories. We would love to hear from UWGB Alums, staff, and current students.

This content was originally posted by the UW-Green Bay Archives and Area Research Center to their facebook page on Thursday, June 11, 2015. View the original Facebook post.